more about: the particular sadness of lemon cake

”Lemon Cake” Author Aimee Bender Answers Your Questions

Hello, Bookies: We’ve heard back from Aimee Bender, the author of The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake, who has provided wonderfully thoughtful answers to your questions. Her comments appear throughout in italics. First off, just a big thank you to all of you for your thoughtful commentary and questions—it was a pleasure reading your comments online. From discussion leader Jennifer […]

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The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake: Conclusion

Hello, bookies. The time has come to discuss Parts Three and Four of The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake. (SPOILER ALERT!) Some of you pointed out that Part One and Part Two felt disconnected from one another.  In the remainder of the book, the author marries the two earlier parts and ties up a lot of loose ends.  While still […]

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The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake: Part Two

Hello, fellow bookies.  So much for light summer reading, huh?  Part Two of The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake contains anything but light fare. (Warning, spoiler alert). The author sums up some key themes when she talks about spring: “It seemed to happen in springs, the revealing of things. With fresher air, and jasmine blooms, something else new: There was […]

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The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake: Part One

Hello, Bookies!   Hope you are enjoying The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake.   I’m finding it to be a quick read filled with pleasant prose.   My immediate impression of our 9-year-old heroine is that she’s lonely. She’s starved (how apropos) for people’s attention, especially her brother’s. She is very accommodating and willing to compromise, as is seen in her […]

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Hi, Bookies.

Hello everyone!

Welcome to the August edition of the No-Obligation Book Club.  I’m Jennifer Mirsky, soon-to-be pets blogger on RealSimple.com’s Simply Stated.
 I’ve been reading an eclectic mix of books this summer—Unaccustomed Earth by Jhumpa Lahiri (just wonderful), Committed: A Skeptic Makes Peace with Marriage by Elizabeth Gilbert (thought-provoking), and The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, by Stieg Larsson (yes, I finally succumbed). Since I’ve come far from the days of buying gifts for people that suited my taste, I primarily chose titles for August that you had expressed interest in reading (and that didn’t seem too heavy or long to qualify as good summer reads). And boy was it a close race! From over 1,000 votes, only five separated this month’s winner from the runner-up: The Big Love. Perhaps you can discuss that in a future round.

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