Sarah Copeland
Sarah Copeland has been the Food Director of Real Simple since 2012, where she oversees the lifestyle brand’s award-winning food content across all platforms. She is also the author of the James-Beard Nominated cookbook Feast: Generous Vegetarian Meals for Any Eater and Every Appetite (Chronicle Books, 2013), and The Newlywed Cookbook (Chronicle Books, 2011). Before joining Real Simple, Sarah spent twelve years contributing to magazines including Saveur, Food & Wine, and Better Homes and Gardens. She spent six years developing recipes at Food Network for FoodNetwork.com, their cookbooks, and Food Network Magazine, and has cooked and taught in kitchens from Mexico to France. An obsessive grower and eater, she thrives on homegrown greens, watermelon, and stinky cheese.

Sarah lives in New York City with her young family. Find her on Twitter + Instagram: @edibleliving

Recent Posts By Sarah Copeland

How I Got My Kid to Eat Kale, Part 1

Every kid has one: the food or dish they’ll eat anytime, anywhere. Call it the bandwagon food—the food they’ve deemed cool or generally okay because everyone at school (or camp, or at the cool kids table) eats it. For my daughter, it’s pasta with pesto—the dish all 12 kids eagerly ate ensemble once a month when her nursery schoolteacher cooked […]

Read More

The Only Homemade Strawberry Ice Cream Recipe You’ll Ever Need

Last week I told you about my favorite commercial ice creams, but nothing short of manna from heaven could compete with the tidal wave of flavor and goodness that is Ample Hills Creamery—a tiny family-owned ice-cream shop in Brooklyn, New York. If you’re going to be in NYC this summer (or ever) put this spot on the top of your […]

Read More

The Best Ice Cream, Ever

Homemade ice cream is magical. Once a summer, at my grandma and granddad’s house in Missouri, where there were enough cousins to take turn churning the old hand crank, we made the world’s most perfectly creamy vanilla ice cream. Weeks later, following our return home to Illinois, nostalgia would set in, and my dad would haul out our own hand-crank […]

Read More