Helping spread Cheer to military families

December 21, 2011 | By | Comments (2)

As readers know, I recently took on the role of Girl Scout leader for my daughter’s Daisy troop. Each week, one parent takes responsibility for helping the girls earn a patch by running an activity – this week was my turn to help the girls as they worked to earn the yellow “Helpful and Friendly” petal.

In addition to talking about all the ways the girls can help around the house (high on the list was cleaning rooms, low on the list was washing windows), and creating “A Daisy Was Here” cards which they could leave whenever they helped, we discussed how important it is to say “thank you.”

We talked about the holidays and how many of us were looking forward to seeing family this week. We also talked about how families with loved ones serving in the military may not have the opportunity to see moms, dads, siblings, aunts, uncles, grandparents or others because they were overseas.

To help reinforce this messages of saying thank you to people who help us, even those we’ve never met, I gave each girl a “Cheer” postcard from a Cheerios box, explaining that each postcard would be sent to a family of a solider, and Cheerios would donate $1 to the United Service Organization (USO). (I also attached a sticker that read “Girl Scouts Daisy Troop NUMBER of Eastern Massachusetts, Ashland, MA” so the families would understand why the postcards were written in crayon).

With the girls help, we were able to return 17 postcards to the USO.

Send "Cheer" to Military FamiliesThanks to Cheerios for sending me a stack of postcards for the girls, so I didn’t have to destroy all my cereal boxes.

If you have a specially marked box of Cheerios in your pantry, don’t forget to cut out the “Cheer” and send it in. For each postcard received, Cheerios will donate $1 to the USO to help support programs for military families.  Cheerios has already donated $150,000 and will donate up to an additional $100,000 based upon the number of postcards received by November 30, 2012.

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